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Speed Reading Acceleration Secrets Course

Speed Reading Acceleration Secrets

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The Term or Quarterly Schedule

It's important to design a long-term study schedule, which should cover the entire quarter or semester. To set up such a plan, a sample of which appears on page 52, it's necessary to ascertain all the important dates on the academic calendar. These include deadlines for papers, scheduled quizzes, times for major tests and oral presentations.

Many people resist keeping lists or writing down appointments. But the most successful people, including the most successful students, are usually ardent list-makers and schedule-keepers. I don't know of any top executives who fail to keep some sort of daily schedule diary or "to do" list!

Yet many students are just as busy as high-ranking corporate executives or professional people. In fact, right now may turn out to be the busiest time of your life, if you're an active, ambitious student. Trying to juggle study assignments, tests, term papers and one or more extracurricular activities and a regular social life can seem overwhelming—

especially to the disorganized. So it's essential for you to learn the art of devising and sticking to a written personal schedule.

Some of the most frustrating times of my own life have been the few times when I've failed to record an appointment or a deadline. On those occasions, I've sometimes found to my chagrin that a project I've forgotten about is due, or an important person I had planned to meet has been left stranded.

It only takes one or two such embarrassments to impress any conscientious person with the fact that written schedules are absolutely essential for a successful, well-ordered life. There's no reason for any student to forget a term-paper deadline, overlook a homework assignment or fail to remember to study for a test. It's just a matter of learning what the key dates and requirements are and then writing them down.

In addition to figuring out the big picture for your academic year, it's also important to draw up a weekly and daily schedule so that studying, leisure activities, meals and extracurricular commitments can be recorded in one place. This way, you will be able to see at a glance exactly where you have to be and what's required of you at a given hour on a given day.

How to Set Up a Weekly Schedule

As you devise a weekly schedule like the one on page 53, these suggestions should help:

Write your class schedule and other permanent activities in ink. Then fill out the rest of the schedule in pencil, since you may have to make changes as the term progresses.

Insert your mealtimes on the chart. Be sure to allow enough time for a leisurely meal and for travel between the

REMEMBER EVERYTHING YOU READ Sample Term Schedule

DATE

MISCELLANEOUS

PAPERS

EXAMS

October 1

PHYSICAL SCIENCE QUIZ

October 15

PHYSICAL SCIENCE QUIZ

October 29

ENGLISH PAPER

October 29

PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAB REPORT

November 12

PHYSICAL SCIENCE MIDTERM

November 15

FRENCH MIDTERM

November 17

PSYCHOLOGY MIDTERM

November 17

PSYCHOLOGY EXPERIMENT

November 23

HISTORY PAPER

December 3

PHYSICAL SCIENCE QUIZ

December 17

ENGLISH PAPER

December 17

PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAB. REPORT

January 17

PHYSICAL SCIENCE QUIZ

Special schedule to be announced/Feb.

FRENCH FINAL

n

PSYCHOLOGY FINAL

ENGLISH FINAL

HISTORY FINAL

PHYSICAL SCIENCE FINAL

Copyright O 1984 Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics, Inc

Copyright O 1984 Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics, Inc

YOUR ACADEMIC FLIGHT PLAN Sample Weekly Schedule

MON. TUES. WED. THÜRS. FRI. SAT. SUN.

7.00

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

Breakfast

8:00

FRENCH CLASS

Study History

FRENCH CLASS

Study History

FRENCH CLASS

Study History

9:00

Study French

HISTORY CLASS

Study French

HISTORY CLASS

Study French

HISTORY CLASS

10:00

PSYCH CLASS

Study History

PSYCH CLASS

Study History

PSYCH CLASS

Study History

11:00

ENGLISH CLASS

Study Phy. Sci.

Study Psycn.

Study Phy. Sci.

ENGLISH CLASS

12:00

LUNCH

LUNCH

LUNCH

LUNCH

LUNCH

1:00

Study English

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Study English

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Study English

2:00

Study Psycn.

Study Phy. Sci.

ENGLISH REC

PHY SCI LAB

Study Psycn.

3:00

Study Psych.

ENGLISH REC

PHY SCI LAB

Study Psych.

4:00

PE.

Study English

PE

Overall Review of

5:00

Study English

Study Phy Sci.

Week's Work

6:00

DINNER

DINNER

DINNER

DINNER

DINNER

DINNER

7:00

Study Psych.

8:00

Study English

Study French

Study English

Study French

Study French

9:00

Daily Review

Daily Review

Daily Review

Daily-Review

Copyright © 1984 Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics. Inc

Copyright © 1984 Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics. Inc place where you're eating and your study space or classroom. And remember what your mother probably always told you: Eating regular meals, including a substantial breakfast, is essential for keeping energy levels high for academic work.

Brain work requires adequate calories and nutrients. If you aren't on a proper diet, you'll probably find you lack the ability to work hard and concentrate for sufficient periods of time to get the most out of your studies.

Now, let me provide you with a few more preliminary tips and guidelines that top students have found useful as they plan their study schedules:

The forty-minute formula. In drawing up your own term, weekly and daily schedules, it's important to think in terms of forty-minute study blocks. Longer study periods lead to restlessness, cramped bodies and wandering minds. Most students learn and remember at their highest level of efficiency during the first ten and final ten minutes of these forty-minute periods.

As we'll see later, these two ten-minute segments correspond nicely with two important phases of "supersonic" reading: the preview process, which involves getting a grasp on the main ideas and overall flow of the reading material; and the postview phase, which includes final review, note-taking and note-organizing—a process that enables the student to recall the material better at a later time.

The two-week rule. Work very steadily and diligently during the first two weeks of the term. This means a minimum of five hours a day, six days a week in study, for a total of at least sixty hours of reading and note-taking during those two weeks.

Using the high-speed reading and study techniques you'll find in this book, plan to read all your basic class assignments during this initial two-week period. Also, you should formulate comprehensive notes—the "recall patterns" I mentioned briefly in the first chapter—on everything that's read. (We'll be going into the recall pattern concept in much more detail in chapter five.) As the term progresses, review and coordinate the reading you've done with relevant lectures and class discussions.

(Note: This rule works best with college courses or in schools where the student knows all the reading assignments at the beginning of the term. If your instructor is in the habit of assigning reading in a piecemeal fashion throughout the term—and if you can't get him to give you the requirements in advance—the best alternative approach is simply to read the assignments immediately as they're handed out.) At first glance, this goal may seem impossible, and given your former study and reading methods, it probably is. But with the Evelyn Wood approach, many students find that only one week at this pace is sufficient to complete all their term reading assignments. I'm just suggesting two weeks to make things relatively relaxing for you.

One student, for instance, had pushed his average reading speed up to about 1,200 words per minute. But being conservative, he lowered his estimate of his capabilities for this two-week exercise: He assumed that he could manage an average of 1,000 words per minute. Furthermore, he planned to put in the recommended minimum time of sixty hours in the first two weeks.

As he looked over the assigned materials, he saw that he would be responsible for two "big" reading courses, English and history. The three other classes—one foreign language, a math class and a science course—involved shorter but denser texts.

In the English and history classes, he found that the total number of words he had to read during the term was 1.6 million (the equivalent of twenty 200-page books, averaging 400 words per page). At 1,000 words per minute, he figured he could go through this material in 1,600 minutes, or less than 27 hours!

He had allotted a minimum of thirty hours of study for the first week. So he could count on getting through all the reading and initial note-taking on the texts for those two extensive reading courses before the first week of classes was finished—and still have plenty of time for extracurricular activities and relaxation.

He also used his supersonic reading capabilities on the other three courses during the initial two-week period. But the foreign language, math and science classes required him to go through considerably fewer pages than the English and history did. Consequently, he finished the initial once-through reading and note-taking for these three courses by the middle of the second week.

At the same time, however, this student recognized that these other three courses contained exceptionally unfamiliar and complex subject matter. So he knew this initial, once-through reading was just the beginning. He planned to work on some of the more difficult problem solving and other time-consuming projects throughout the term.

The relaxed study rhythm rule. In the middle part of the term or quarter—which constitutes most of the weeks in the school year—the student on this program can, in effect, relax into a slow but steady study rhythm. It's hard for many students to believe how easy and enjoyable, yet productive and stimulating, this time of the school year can be, as long as they have observed the two-week rule.

Most students find they can settle into a pace that involves about two to three hours of study a day, five days a week. That means only about 10 to 15 hours of study each week —not an unusually heavy load at all for secondary school or college.

Of course, the amount of time you devote to study can't be determined by some rigid formula. Sometimes you may find that you can do well on less than ten hours a week. Other times, such as just before the deadlines for term papers or midterm exams, you may want to put in more than fifteen hours per week.

Remember, there's a rhythm to study that you should learn to discern and follow for the best results. Also, different courses may impose varying learning requirements that call for different study techniques.

For example, some of your study time will undoubtedly be devoted to memory work—such as learning vocabulary words in a foreign language. It's been suggested that twenty to thirty minutes for one memorizing session is plenty for most students. Any more, and the mind tends to wander.

A memory plan that works for many students: Take about twenty minutes to work on the memory assignment; then take a break or shift to another area of study, such as reading; and finally, come back to the memory work for another twenty-minute session.

Reading literature, on the other hand, can continue for two to three hours at a stretch or even longer if the student remains interested. In general, though, as I mentioned earlier, most experts feel that about forty minutes, with five- to ten-minute breaks between sessions, is the optimum time for study.

What else do the best students do with this relaxed time period in the middle of the term? They commonly follow several study practices:

They mesh their class sessions and their study. Because even the best students sometimes have trouble sitting down to work, many find it helpful to use their lectures to warm up for study.

It's always advisable to get involved in the lecture, for example by silently asking yourself questions as the instructor speaks. Also, you might jot down your own thoughts on the subject as you take notes on what the teacher is saying.

But in most cases, listening to a lecture is a more passive, less demanding activity than the really active work required in reading. So why not use the relatively comfortable environment of the classroom to ease into study?

The easiest way to accomplish this is to schedule at least an hour of study immediately after the lecture, or as soon afterward as is feasible. Then, spend the first five to ten minutes reorganizing your class notes from the lecture. The rest of the study time should be devoted to reading about the subject matter of the lecture class and taking notes on the reading.

If the class is a discussion class rather than a lecture, however, you'll want to take a different approach. For one thing, you'll be expected to become much more active in interacting with the instructor. In fact, higher grades often come from high-quality contributions in such classes.

So I suggest that you schedule a study period before the discussion class. During that time, review the subject matter that you expect the instructor to be talking about, and also read and study related materials that might be used in the discussion. The preliminary study period, plus the discussion in the classroom, will help burn the subject matter into your memory and should provide positive payoffs later on exams.

Warming up before a discussion class can be especially helpful for language courses. When you're learning a new language, frequent review of vocabulary and grammar is essential in developing facility in oral presentations. By engaging in review before class and then using this material during class, you'll find your knowledge of the new language grows rapidly.

The best students continue to read optional and background material in their various courses. The broader your knowledge of a subject, the better you'll tend to do on papers and tests. Also, the extra reading helps put the required reading into a better perspective and firmer intellectual context. The result is improved recall and understanding of the required material.

Also, this supplementary reading will provide you with a head start on doing research for any course papers that may be due.

The best students reread selected parts of the required assignments, especially those sections that seemed difficult on the first go-around. During these study sessions, the top students rework their reading notes (recall patterns) and add to them as needed.

Also, they may begin to memorize certain facts, including the spelling of key names and places, the dates of major events and even short quotations. With regard to this last point, a number of students have found that they can make a tremendously positive impression on instructors by slipping in a direct quote, with page references, from an assigned book or article.

The top learners ask their teachers questions about things they don't understand. Besides clearing up any confusion, a one-to-one conversation with the person who will be designing and grading your tests can provide other invaluable insights and advantages. A number of students report that they've gained extremely helpful ideas about how the teacher's mind works, and also what to expect on exams. In most cases, giving the teacher a chance to get to know you and to see your interest in the subject can only work to your advantage. Remember, though, that most instructors have more time early in the term than later, when they're preparing exams, or grading exams and papers.

Tips for Preparing Short Papers

Your written term schedule should alert you to the deadlines for turning in written assignments. To meet these demands, you should begin weeks in advance gathering material for a long paper, and at least one week in advance for a short paper.

Here's a suggested five-day "flash" schedule for preparing those short papers, which will typically run from two to ten typed, double-spaced pages:

Day 1: Think through the course material and select a particular theme or topic for your report. Then, gather the books, recall patterns and other notes that relate to that topic and glance through them to refresh your memory. Finally, draft an outline (recall pattern) for the paper.

Day 2: Read through your outline again and add or change material as required. Then, write a complete first draft of the paper. If you have access to a computer with a word processing package, use it. This writing tool will be a big help with the first draft and will enable you to make later changes more easily.

But don't expect this draft to be the final one that you'll turn in. Your goal on this second day is just to get the first

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Helping Your Child Learn To Read

Helping Your Child Learn To Read

When parents help their children learn to read, they help open the door to a new world. As a parent, you can begin an endless learning chain: You read to your children, they develop a love of stories and poems, they want to read on their own, they practice reading, and finally they read for their own information or pleasure. They become readers, and their world is forever expanded and enriched.

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