Key versus standard notes

The main body of a person's recalling is of this key concept nature. It is not, as is often assumed, a word-for-word verbatim process. When people describe books they have read or places they have been to, they do not start to 're-read' from memory. They give key concept overviews outlining the main characters, settings, events and add descriptive detail. Similarly the single key word or phrase will bring back whole ranges of experience and sensation. Think for example of the range of images...

Linear history of speech and print

For the last few hundred years it has been popularly thought that man's mind worked in a linear or list-like manner. This belief was held primarily because of the increasing reliance on our two main methods of communication, speech and print. In speech we are restricted, by the nature of time and space, to speaking and hearing one word at a time. Speech was thus seen as a linear or line-like process between people. See fig32. Fig32 Speech has traditionally been seen as a list-like affair. See...

7heaven car

Imagine all the angels sitting on cars rather than clouds. Imagine a gate made completely out of giant pencils rather than normal wood. Imagine a vine as large as Jack in the Bean Stalk's bean stalk, and instead of leaves on the vine, hang it all over with brightly coloured shirts blowing in the wind. Now fill in as many of the words as you can on the facing page. With a little practice it would be possible to remember ten out of ten each time, even though using the same system. The words to be...

Approaching the study situation a problem before you start

The Six - o'clock - In - The - Evening - Enthusiastic - Determined is a person with whom you are probably already familiar. At 6 o'clock he approaches his desk, and carefully organises everything in preparation for the study period to follow. Having everything in place he next carefully adjusts each item again, giving him time to complete the first excuse he recalls that in the morning he did not have quite enough time to read all items of interest in the newspaper. He also realises that if he...

Noting of knowledge on the subject

Having decided on the amounts to be covered, next jot down as much as you know on the subject as fast as you can. No more than two minutes should be devoted to the exercise. Notes should be in key words and in creative pattern form. The purpose of this exercise is to improve concentration, to eliminate wandering, and to establish a good mental 'set'. This last term refers to getting the conscious mind filled with important rather than unimportant information. If you have spent two minutes...

Dedicated to YOU

To my beloved Mum and Dad, Jean and Gordon Buzan With thanks to all those whose effort and co-operation enabled me to write this book Zita Albes Astrid Andersen Jeannie Beattie Nick Beytes Mark Brown Joy Buttery my brother, Barry Buzan Bernard Chibnall Steve and Fanny Colling Susan Crockford Tricia Date Charles Elton Lorraine Gill Bill Harris Brian Helweg-Larsen Thomas Jarlov Trish Lillis Hermione Lovell Annette McGee Joe McMahon Khalid Ranjah Auriol Roberts Ian Rosenbloom Caitrina Ni...

The Browse

Before doing anything else, it is essential to 'browse' or look through the entire book or periodical you are about to study. The browse should be done in the way you would look through a book you were considering buying in a bookshop, or in the way you would look through a book you were considering taking out from the library. In other words casually, but rather rapidly, flipping through the pages, getting the general 'feel' of the book, observing the organisation and structure, the level of...

Modern technology

Recent developments in more refined technology have fortunately given us a much better analogy the hologram. In this technique, an especially concentrated light or laser beam is split into two. One half of the ray is directed to the plate, while the other half is bounced off the image and then directed back to the other half of the ray. The special holographic plate records the millions of fragments into which the rays shatter when they collide. When dais plate is held up in front of laser...

Bibliography

Human memory McGraw-Hill, 1967. Alexander, F. M. The Alexandertechnique the essential writings of F. Matthias Alexander ed. E. Maisel. Thames and Hudson, 1974. o.p. published originally as The resurrection of the body New York University Books, 1969. o.p. Dell Publishing, paperback 1974. o.p. Bergamini, D. The universe Time-Life International, 1968. Bono, E. de Children solveproblems A. Lane, 1972. o.p. Penguin Books, 1972. o.p. New York Harper and Row, 1974. o.p. Brown, M. E....

Exercise and discussion

Imagine that your hobby is reading short stories, that you read at least five a day, and that you keep notes so that you will not forget any of them. Imagine also that in order to ensure a proper recall of each story you use a card filing system. For each story you have one card for the title and author, and a card for every paragraph. On each of these paragraph cards you enter a main and a secondary key word or phrase. The key words phrases you take either directly from the story or make up...

Special memory systems mnemonics Test

Since the time of the Greeks certain individuals have impressed their fellow men with the most amazing feats of memory. They have been able to remember hundreds of items backwards and forwards and in any order dates and numbers names and faces and have been able to perform special memory feats such as memorising whole areas of knowledge perfectly, or remembering decks of cards in the order anyone chose to present them. In most cases these individuals were using special memorising techniques...

Advanced mind maps

Observing that the brain handles information better if the information is designed to 'slot in', and observing also the information from this chapter about the dimensional nature of the mind, it follows that notes which are themselves more 'holographic' and creative will be far more readily understood, appreciated and recalled. There are many devices we can use to make such notes These can be used to show how concepts which appear on different parts of a pattern are connected. The arrow can be...

Continuing Review

Apart from the immediate review, a continuing review programme is essential, and should be constructed in the light of the knowledge we have concerning memory as discussed in the chapter on Memory. It was seen that memory did not decline immediately after a learning situation, but actually rose before levelling off and then plummeting. Fig55 Graph showing that memory actually rises after learning, before declining sharply. See text this page. This graph can be warped to your advantage by...

Afterword

As you approach the end of Use Your Head I hope that you will be realising that it is not the end, but the real beginning. With the physical beauty and complexity of your brain, and its enormous intellectual and emotional powers, with your ability to absorb information and to manage the memorisation of that information, and with the new techniques for allowing your brain to express and organise itself in matters which are more comprehensibly attuned to the way you function, reading, studying,...

Models of perception brain mind

As recently as the 1950s the camera provided the model for our perception and mental imaging the lens of the camera corresponded to the lens of the eye, and the photographic plate to the brain itself. See fig 39. This conception was held for some time but was very inadequate. You can confirm this inadequacy by doing the following exercises in the way that one normally does when drowsily day-dreaming, close your eyes and imagine your favourite object. Having clearly registered the image on your...

Old and new study approaches

The situations described above are unsatisfactory for everyone concerned, and have arisen for various reasons, many of them oudined in earlier parts of this book. One further and major reason for poor study results lies in the way we have approached both study techniques and the information we wanted people to study. We have surrounded the person with a confusing mass of different subjects or 'disciplines' demanding that he learn, remember and understand a frightening array under headings such...

Use Your Head

Speed Memory Speed Reading Spore One Advanced Learning and Reading - Manual (with Bernard Chibnall) The Evolving Brain (with Terry Dixon) Make the Most of Your Mind Based on Use Your Head -a BBC series of ten television programmes produced by Nancy Thomas. Acknowledgement the Illustration on page 12 is from 'The organisation of the brain' (page 102) by Walle J. H. Nauta and Michael Feirtag, copyright September 1979 by SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Inc. All rights reserved. The Illustrations on pages...

Review mental ability and age

The way in which a person reviews has an interesting connection with popular ideas about the way human mental ability declines with age. It is normally assumed that IQ scores, recall ability, ability to see spacial relationships, perceptual speed, speed of judgement, induction, figural relations, associative memory, intellectual level, intellectual speed, semantic relations, formal reasoning and general reasoning etc., decline after reaching a peak at the age of 18 to 25 see fig23. Valid as the...

4 Noting

Exercise - key words standard responses Key words and concepts - creative and recall Multi-ordinate nature of words Individual's interpretation of words Memory - a comparison between standard note and key word noting B Mind maps for recall and creative thinking 86 Linear history of speech and print Contrast the structure of the brain Advanced note taking and mapping techniques C Mind maps - advanced methods and uses 106 Technology and new insights into ourselves the hologram as a model for the...

Asking questions defining goals

Having established the current state of knowledge on the subject, it is next advisable to decide what you want from the book. This involves defining the questions you want answered during the reading. The questions should be asked in the context of goals aimed for and should, like the noting of knowledge, be done in key word and mind map form. Many prefer to use a different coloured pen for this section, and rather than starting a new map they add their questions to the already existing map on...

Mind maps uses

The nature of mind maps is intimately connected with the function of the mind, and they can be used in nearly every activity where thought, recall, planning or creativity are involved. Figure 41 is a mind map of the use of mind maps, showing this wide variety of uses. Detailed explanation of each of these aspects would of course take up a large book, but in the remainder of this chapter I shall explain the application of maps to the speech writing, essay writing, examination type of task to...

Noteworthy material

4 Marginal straight lines for important or note-worthy material. 5 Curved or wavey marginal lines to indicate unclear or difficult material. 6 Question marks for areas that you wish to question or that you find questionable. 7 Exclamation marks for outstanding items. 8 Your own symbol code for items and areas that relate to your own specific and general objectives. If the book is not valuable, markings can be made in colour codes. If the book is a cherished volume, then markings can be made...

Mind Maps and the Left and Right Brain

At this point it is useful to consider how recent research into the brain adds strength to the points raised so far. In light of the fact, as already outlined, that the brain handles information better if the information is designed to 'slot in', consider the left and right brain research of Roger Sperry and Robert Ornstein. This research alone would lead you to conclude that a note taking and thought-organisation technique designed to satisfy the needs of the whole brain would have to include...

The brain and advanced noting

Radiant Mind Maps

If the brain is to relate to information most efficiently the information must be structured in such a way as to 'slot in' as easily as possible. It follows that if the brain works primarily with key concepts in an interlinked and integrated manner, our notes and our word relations should in many instances be structured in this way rather than in traditional 'lines'. Rather than starting from the top and working down in sentences or lists, one should start from the centre or main idea and...

Advanced reading techniques

Apart from the general advice given above, some readers may be able to benefit from the following information which is usually practised in conjunction with a qualified instructor 1 Visual aid techniques When children learn how to read they often point with their finger to the words they are reading. We have traditionally regarded this as a fault and have told them to take their fingers off the page. It is now realised that it is we and not the children who are at fault. Instead of insisting...

5 The Buzan Organic Study Method 117

Problems of 'getting down' to study Reasons for fear and reluctance when approaching study books Problems arising from the use of standard study techniques Study planned to suit the individual's needs Defining the areas and amount of study Distribution of the student's effort Noting of current knowledge on the subject being studied Planning approach to the new subject Defining reasons for study and goals to be achieved Study overview Preview Inview Review Summary of the Buzan Organic Study...

The chapters

Each chapter deals with a different aspect of your brain's functioning. First the book outlines the most up-to-date information about the brain and then applies this information to the way in which your vision can be best used. Next, a chapter explains how you can improve memory both during and after learning. In addition a special system is introduced for the perfect memorisation of listed items. The middle chapters explore the brain's internal 'maps'. This information about how you think is...

Study Overview

One of the interesting facts about people using study books is that most, when given a new text, start reading on page one. It is not advisable to start reading a new study text on the first page. The following situation is a parallel illustration of this point Imagine that you are a fanatic jigsaw-puzzle-doer. A friend arrives on your doorstep with a gigantic box wrapped in paper and tied with string, and tells you that it's a present 'the most beautiful and complex jigsaw puzzle yet divised...

Transforming a mind map to a speech article etc

Many people, when first shown mind maps, assume that they cannot be used for any linear purpose, such as giving a talk or writing an article. Nothing could be further from the truth. If you refer to the mind map of this chapter on page 100, you will find how such a transformation took place Once the map has been completed, the required information is readily available. All that is necessary is to decide the final order in which to present the information. A good mind map will offer a number of...

Preparation

The Organic Study Method is divided into two main sections Preparation and Application. Each of these sections is divided into four sub sections Application Overview Preview Inview Review It is important to note at the outset that although the main steps are presented in a certain order, this order is by no means essential and can be changed, subtracted from and added to as the study texts warrant. This section will deal with the Preparation