Inductive force

Consider this argument:

P1) Fiona lives in Inverness.

C) Fiona owns at least one item of woollen clothing.

Is this argument valid? One might think so. Inverness, in northern Scotland, is a pretty cold place. And there are a great many sheep, hence a great deal of wool, in the vicinity of Inverness. So surely one may conclude that, if Fiona does live in Inverness, then she's got at least, say, a woollen jumper or two. Nevertheless, the argument is clearly invalid: it would not be impossible for someone to live in Inverness, yet have no woollen items of clothing. Indeed, it is probable that there really are some people there without any (some people are allergic to wool, for example).

Now we could make the argument valid by adding the premise, 'Everyone in Inverness owns at least one woollen item of clothing'. Thus:

P1) Fiona lives in Inverness.

P2) Everyone in Inverness owns at least one woollen item of clothing.

C) Fiona owns at least one woollen item of clothing.

Inductive force

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