It Starts with the Question

Suppose I started with this question, "What's a highly unusual design that you would never expect to find on socks?"

Would I have heard "black" or "Gold Toe" or "knee-high"? No. Would I have heard "argyle, paisley, stripes" if I had asked for an unusual design? Not on your life. You see, in my workshops, and prob-

Camera tilts up to top of bottle.

Hand twists cap off and places on bottle upside down.

Music pauses as you slap yourself upside the head.

Camera tilts up to top of bottle.

Hand twists cap off and places on bottle upside down.

Music pauses as you slap yourself upside the head.

A gazillion people have looked at the Bud bottle cap (20 gazillion if you count college kids). Then someone takes a fresh look and the King of Beers is officially crowned. The lesson: Never stop looking for the fresh perspective. This is one of the freshest Bud spots in years. Go figure.

©Anheuser-Busch ably on these worksheets, the early answers tend to be pretty lame. And I'll take the blame, because I was asking pretty lame questions. I was asking questions that allowed you to stay in the known. It's human nature to want to know the answer. Since our childhood years we've always strived to know the answer, and the answer is something that already exists, so we tend to go with what already exists. Besides, saying "Bela Lugosi in a swimsuit" without permission is really putting yourself out there. If you immediately answered, "Bela-Lugosi-in-a-swimsuit socks!" I might even think you're a little strange, and I'm the creative thinking coach who's trying to get you to think out of the box.

The mind is capable of imagining much more than what you know, particularly if encouraged to do so. It's just that we tend to put ourselves in a predefined context in terms of solving problems or answering questions. This determines how we approach a situation. We put ourselves in a context that can be addressed with a known, but when asked progressively more probing questions, you had no choice but to push your mind out to a place you've never been before. By definition, the question forced you there.

This Lobotomy tool, as I stated, is called Ask a Better Question. It's been around since the beginning of time. Wasn't that the Socratic method? Questions?

Questions have caused people to think better for years. When you asked a question in college, didn't your best professors answer with a question? Why? Because that made you think.

Some of the greatest thinkers of all time have asked great questions. You, when you're at your creative best, ask great questions, too.

0 0

Post a comment