Inspired by 180 Heat

Lyricist Sammy Cahn, one of the most prolific songwriters of the twentieth century, with standards such as "Carolina in the Morning," "High Hopes," and "All the Way" to his credit, tells a story about how he and his songwriting partner Jule Styne were inspired to write a song using 180° Thinking. It seems they had just exited a Hollywood producer's office with an assignment to write a song for an upcoming Bing Crosby movie. As they were going from the air-conditioned sanctuary of the office out into the 100+° heat on the steaming sidewalk, one of this famous writing duo suggested, "Let's go to the beach to write the song." Whereupon his partner is reputed to have suggested, "What do you say we just write a cool song?"

The result of this hot-weather-inspired effort was the classic holiday song, "Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!"

Timeline of a great idea (continued)

Timeline of a lousy idea (continued)

Bell-bottoms came back. Maybe there's hope for your idea yet.

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Cheat Notes for Chapter 8:180° Thinking

If you want to find new ideas, you have to took in a different place; 180° is "totally"different thinking.

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180° Thinking easily takes your mind out of the predictable patterns that bring you to the same place by forcing you to ignore att of the preconceptions in any category of thinking.

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Direct your thought process in the exact opposite direction of where conventional wisdom would suggest you go.

If conventional wisdom says "soft," think "hard." If conventional wisdom says "warm," think "cottd."

If an attribute doesn't have an easily defined opposite, use the negative (e.g., for "rectangular,"think "notrectangular").

Even if you don't find an answer at 180°, you have a new place to start your creative process.

Oh, by the way, did you understand "tnereffid" in the chapter

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title? Its different spelled backward.

This is where the expression "Thinking outside the box" comes from. Most people limit themselves to the area defined by the nine dots, in which case the puzzle cannot be solved. But as soon as you "think outside the box" it's much easier. The solution is located on page 257 if you haven't figured it out already.

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