180 Wedding

One early example of my use of these tools was on my wedding day. A mere 20 years old, and my bride, Audrey, even younger, we exhibited clear 180° Thinking in choosing the setting for our official wedding album photos.

I figured, "Hey, everybody shoots their wedding pictures at a park or in a garden, always someplace serene and beautiful. So why not do something at the far other end of the spectrum?" (I had not yet unveiled the term 180° Thinking.) "Why not go to a dump?"

Well, thankfully, I didn't go with my first idea and we didn't go to a dump to take the photographs that were to document this most important day. We went to a salvage yard.

The National Wrecking Company in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, became the canvas upon which we asked our friend and soon-to-be-brother-in-law Jon McNally to capture the spirit of this special day. The various backdrops, besides the old furnace section of the salvage

yard shown here, included the bathtub, sink, and toilet departments, and that was just the bathroom section.

Did I mention my father-in-law did not get out of the car for a single photo?

Toward the end of the photo session we decided to take a "straight" shot for the last page of the wedding album, if taking a straight photo is at all possible in a salvage yard.

Did I mention it was a steamy August 29 around high noon? Can you imagine what a hot August 29 around high noon smells like in a salvage yard?

We all lined up in a clearing at the center of the parking lot for the formal wedding party photograph shown here.

To demonstrate that she was second to no one when it came to 180° Thinking, and to further set the tone for what has become a fun, creative marriage (31 years and counting), Audrey trumped me with the suggestion for the last, final photo for the wedding album.

The photograph on page 260, a 180° version of the straight shot, became the exclamation mark at the end of our photo album. I have chosen it as the punctuation for the end of this book.

The Beginning.

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